December 11th 2011

Holiday fashion tips: avoiding disasters

The holiday season is loaded with fun, family, friends, parties, and get togethers. It is the chance to get all dolled up, wear loads of bling, and find that perfect party outfit to feel and look great.

But just like the holiday season is the best time for looking slick, it’s also that time of year where you definitely want to avoid a fashion disaster.

Unless, of course, you’re at an Ugly Christmas Sweater party.

With a little bit of preparation and a bit of know-how, you can easily learn how to avoid the common holiday fashion faux-pas’ when looking your best for the rest of 2011.

Ditch (some of) the Glitz

Okay, don’t ditch all of the glitz. After all, it is the holiday season and the perfect time for glitter and sparkles! But wearing too much glitz isn’t so great, either. Yes, any sort of shimmer, metallics, beading, and bright fabric are perfectly fine for the holidays. In fact, we bed for them! The glitziness is what makes the holidays what it is!

But keep in mind barring too much shine: no matter what, too much shine can overwhelm anyone, especially if you wear it on parts of your body that you don’t want to accentuate. Play up your features. If you have gorgeous hair, look for some holiday flair in your hair accessories. Or pick up a great little purse or shoes. Accessories is where its at for glitz, or play up parts of your body that are meant to be on the forefront.

Dress in Moderation

Yes, we all like to look a little slinkier in our holiday garb, but showing too much skin isn’t realistic. Super low dresses and super high skirts aren’t really in place at this type of event. In addition, most people can’t carry them off (yes, it is time to be honest with yourself). Think of winter-inspired sexy: leave lots to the imagination, and go with accentuating your best features. Lace, bling, glitz, and brights: those are the way to go. Leave sleazy at the door (okay, and maybe under the mistletoe).

Plan Ahead

A last minute party, or two, minute be imminent, so don’t get caught with nothing to wear. If you’re invited to a party and you’re hunting through your closet, it definitely shouldn’t be frustrating, but exciting instead. Keep a few dressy basics in your wardrobe so you’re always prepared for any last minute invites. Keep them basic so you can change them up by adding different pieces and accessories to bring it altogether.

Keep It Simple

Don’t worry about going over the top, and dressing to match and find viable separates. Keeping it simple makes you look elegant and, well, simple… in a sultry, sexy, sort of way. It’s true that the little black dress doesn’t go out of style, and you can add lots of glitz and glam to really make it your own.

Dress the Occasion

No matter where you end up heading, be sure that you are dressed for the occasion. Nothing is worse than showing up to a party and being completely over dressed or under dressed. Be sure to find out beforehand what the dress is: casual, formal, business. If you have trouble deciphering dress codes on a party invitation, here are the details:

Black Tie: Formal attire; tuxedos, cocktail dresses, little black dress.

Formal: Usually the same as black tie.

White Tie: Men in full dress, white tie, vest, shirt; women in long gowns.

Black Tip Optional: the option of a tux or formal dress, but really, then go for it or a dark suit.

Creative Black Tie: Black tie with trendy interpretation. Short evening gowns are okay.

Semi-Formal: Tuxes and formal dresses not required; dark suits and cocktail dresses.

Business Formal: Often same as semi-formal, but women should have more of a dressy suit. Nothing too sexy.

Cocktail Attire: dark suits and short, elegant dresses.

Informal: not casual! Instead, semi-formal.

Festive: Not necessarily the ugly sweater, but go for informal/semi-formal, with a bit of holiday glitz.

Dressy Casual: dressed up casual, such as trousers, sportcoats, and dressy pants.

Casual: anything goes!

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Andrew's Biography

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Andrew loves art and design, and pursues his studies in his final year at the Ontario College of Art and Design. He loves seeking out new artists and giving them their dues, and in his spare time, focuses on his own abstract sculpture.