September 8th 2011

Glimpses of New York and Amsterdam in 2040

Both Amsterdam and New York are exploring their futures in the long-term. The cities have been affected by various circumstances, such as shifting demographics, changes in climate, energy transitions, and global economic patterns.

And so, together, the Center for Architecture in New York and the Amsterdam Centre for Architecture are looking into the future of these cities.

Both cities have strong business ethics, a long tradition of cultural diversity, and extensive waterfronts; and both cities want to focus on creating livable, sustainable urban environments in which we are to thrive.

A new exhibit,  Glimpses of New York and Amsterdam in 2040 delivers an exchange program between the Center for Architecture in New York and the Amsterdam Centre for Architecture (ARCAM).

Together, they have commissioned architects and landscape architects in both cities to think about the “future of the future,” emphasizing the five basic necessities for living: breathing, eating, making, moving and dwelling.

These futures will be a look into the daily life in both New York and Amsterdam, providing powerful insight into addressing long-term issues.

These issues include the relationship between recreational and working waterfronts; the ecology, remediation and preservation of natural habitat; the control of rising water levels; the preservation and reuse of industrial infrastructure; and the role of transportation in better connecting cities.

 

The exhibit runs from June 8th – September 10th, 2011 at the Center for Architecture in New York City. Work from local firms include dlandstudio, Interboro Partners, Fabrications, and van Bergen Kolpa among others.

Also, check out their Opening Party details on their Facebook page.

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Andrew's Biography

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Andrew loves art and design, and pursues his studies in his final year at the Ontario College of Art and Design. He loves seeking out new artists and giving them their dues, and in his spare time, focuses on his own abstract sculpture.